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Learn WPF and XAML

In case you haven't heard, Windows Forms is going away ... someday. All of the hot, new stuff is written in WPF and XAML. About Visual Basic has an easy-to-read introduction to WPF, and a collection of supporting articles too!

Visual Basic Spotlight10

The Filter Function

Strings may be the second most useful "type" in VB.NET. (Integers are probably the first.) So there is a lot of useful string processing built into VB.NET. The Filter function is one and this article is a fast explanation showing how to use it.

Shallow Copy versus Deep Copy

The pair of terms Shallow Copy and Deep Copy are seen quite frequently in articles about programming. This article explains what they mean.

Copying Reference Types

When you copy a reference type in VB.NET, you can get just a pointer to the same object in memory. This can result in an obscure bug if you're not clear about what's happening. This Quick Tip explains it and how to avoid the bug.

Coding the Double Linked List "The Hard Way"

The linked list is one of the foundation concepts of programming and it's supported directly by VB.NET language elements. But you can code one "the hard way" too. This article shows one way to do that for a double linked list. The article also features some interesting code details with inherited classes and objects on the heap. Understanding this example is a great way to make sure you understand what's really happening in your code.

Design Patterns - The Factory Pattern

Design Patterns deal with the fundamental techniques of how and why you write code in a certain way. This article is one of a series that explains the popular design patterns using the syntax of Visual Basic - VB.NET. The subject of this article is the Factory design pattern.

A Real World Example of the Delegation Design Pattern - Part 3 of 3

This is Part 3 of a series about the Delegation design pattern in VB.NET. This part shows a more real world example of the delegation pattern based on the general case code in part 1 that you can contrast with the inheritance based example in part 2. Part 1 is a theoretical "general case" of the Delegation design pattern and part 2 is a counter example coded using inheritance.

Inheritance - A Contrast with the Delegation Design Pattern - Part 2 of 3

Design Patterns can be difficult. So this article, part 2 about the Delegation design pattern in VB.NET - is actually all about inheritance since it explains an example intended to contrast with delegation that is based on inheritance instead. Parts 1 and 3 explain the delegation pattern.

The General Case Delegation Pattern - Part 1 of 3

Technical articles, including those at About Visual Basic, usually discuss the detailed syntax of VB.NET, not the overall philosophy of why you might want to do things in a certain way. Design Patterns, on the other hand, are all about the why and how of programming, not the syntax. This article, one of a series about design patterns in VB.NET, discusses a design patter that might might have thought you already knew about, the Delegation pattern. Part 1 - this part - explains the general case of delegation.

Using TimeSpan and DateTime

There are two ways to represent time in VB.NET, DateTime and TimeSpan. They're very different, even though they're companion objects. This Quick Tip reveals how they work.

Designing Classes - The Singleton Design Pattern

Technical articles, including those at About Visual Basic, usually discuss the detailed syntax of VB.NET, not the overall philosophy of why you might want to do things in a certain way. Design Patterns, on the other hand, are all about the why and how of programming, not the syntax. This article, one of a series about design patterns in VB.NET, discusses what might be the most popular design pattern, the Singleton pattern.

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